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Post-Cyberpunk

Today on Pop Culture Intelligentsia we talk with Neon Dystopia’s Isaac Wheeler about the maturation of cyberpunk and our dystopian world. This episode is info dense and a lot of fun.

Show Notes & Links

  • Isaac Wheeler
    Neon Dystopia contributor.
  • Cyberpunk, Post-Cyberpunk, and the Maturing of a Genre
    It isn’t so much that cyberpunk became post-cyberpunk, so what next? as it is, where will the cyberpunk genre go as it continues to mature? Cyberpunk never died as Paul Saffo suggested in a WIRED article in 1993, it has simply begun to change as new generations of authors step onto the stage. These authors didn’t grow up reading Dick, Chandler, and Burroughs, they grew up reading Gibson, Stephenson, and other more modern authors. We aren’t thinking about what the world is going to look like when it is interconnected, remember cyberpunk came into existence just as the internet was coming to be. We are thinking about how technology of our future is going to change society. The cyberpunk future of the 80s is now and the cyberpunk future of the 2000s is beginning to unfold as we speak. Cyberpunk will continue to thrive as the future is pushed outward as long as writers are focused on the focal point of where technology and society interact. This isn’t your fathers space swashbucklers, this is about how humanity will be in the future. There will always be dirt in the corners, there will always be bad people abusing power, and there will always be new tech on the horizon beyond the reach of the loner, outcast, or everyman.
  • Neon Dystopia
    Neon Dystopia shares Cyberpunk content from across the web - news, interviews , reviews and analysis on films, games, books, music, and more!
  • Neuromancer
    Neuromancer is a 1984 novel by William Gibson, a seminal work in the cyberpunk genre and the first winner of the science-fiction “triple crown”-the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the Hugo Award. It was Gibson’s debut novel and the beginning of the Sprawl trilogy. The novel tells the story of a washed-up computer hacker hired by a mysterious employer to pull off the ultimate hack.
  • Man in the High Castle (TV Series)
    The Man in the High Castle is an American dystopian alternative history television series produced by Amazon Studios, Scott Free, Headline Pictures, Electric Shepherd Productions and Big Light Productions. The series is loosely based on the 1962 novel of the same name by American science fiction author Philip K. Dick. The story is an alternative history of the world in which the Axis powers won World War II. The United States has been partitioned into three parts: The Japanese puppet state of the Pacific States of America, which comprises the former United States west of the Rocky Mountains; a Nazi puppet state that comprises the eastern half of the former United States; and a neutral zone that acts as a buffer between the two areas, called the Rocky Mountain States.
  • Dr. Adder
    Dr. Adder is a dark science fiction novel by K. W. Jeter set in a future where the United States has largely broken down into reluctantly cooperating enclaves run by a wide variety of strongmen and warlords, with a veneer of government control that seems largely interested in controlling technology. Dr. Adder is an artist-surgeon, who modifies sexual organs of his patients to satisfy the weirdest of perversion; he is clearly depicted as a partly criminal, partly counter-cultural figure in a future Los Angeles which anticipates the cyberpunk idea of the Sprawl.
  • K. W. Jeter
    Kevin Wayne Jeter (born March 26, 1950), known both personally and professionally as K.W. Jeter, is an American science fiction and horror author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and paranoid, unsympathetic characters. He has written novels set in the Star Trek and Star Wars universes, and has written four (to date) sequels to Blade Runner.
  • Transhumanism
    Transhumanism (abbreviated as H+ or h+) is an international and intellectual movement that aims to transform the human condition by developing and creating widely available sophisticated technologies to greatly enhance human intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities. Transhumanist thinkers study the potential benefits and dangers of emerging technologies that could overcome fundamental human limitations, as well as the ethics of using such technologies. The most common thesis is that human beings may eventually be able to transform themselves into different beings with abilities so greatly expanded from the natural condition as to merit the label of posthuman beings.
  • Transmetropolitan
    Transmetropolitan is a cyberpunk, transhumanist comic book series written by Warren Ellis and co-created and designed by Darick Robertson; it was published by American company DC Comics in 1997-2002. The series was originally part of the short-lived DC Comics imprint Helix, but upon the end of the book’s first year the series was moved to the Vertigo imprint and DC Comics shut-down the Helix imprint. Transmetropolitan chronicles the battles of Spider Jerusalem, infamous renegade gonzo journalist of the future, an homage to gonzo journalism founder Hunter S. Thompson. Spider Jerusalem dedicates himself to fighting the corruption and abuse of power of two successive United States presidents; he and his “filthy assistants” strive to keep their world from turning more dystopian than it already is while dealing with the struggles of fame and power, brought about due to the popularity of Spider via his articles.
  • Warren Ellis
    Warren Girard Ellis (born 16 February 1968) is an English author of comics, novels, and television, who is well known for sociocultural commentary, both through his online presence and through his writing, which covers transhumanist (most notably nanotechnology, cryonics, mind transfer, and human enhancement) and folkloric themes, often in combination with each other. He is a resident of Southend-on-Sea, England.
  • RoboCop
    The RoboCop franchise is an American superhero cyberpunk media franchise featuring the futuristic adventures of Alex Murphy, a Detroit, Michigan police officer, mortally wounded in the line of duty who is converted into a powerful cyborg brand named Robocop at the behest of a powerful mega-corporation, Omni Consumer Products. Thus equipped, Murphy battles both violent crime in a severely decayed city and the blatantly corrupt machinations within OCP.
  • The Artificial Kid
    The Artificial Kid is a science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling. It was originally published in 1980. The Artificial Kid takes place on the planet Reverie, a world of coral continents, levitating islands, and the corrosive, transformative wilderness of “The Mass.” Reverie has been transformed into a utopia/dystopia, with a stark class division. Arti, a heavily biologically modified boy from the Decriminalized Zone, becomes a pop star by selling videos of himself engaging in bloody combat with other fighters for the entertainment of the upper classes. When Reverie’s founder, Moses Moses emerges from seven centuries of cryosleep, and Arti discovers an unpleasant secret about his past, both have to flee to escape from the powers of the “Cabal” that controls Reverie from behind the scenes.
  • Bruce Sterling
    Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author known for his novels and work on the Mirrorshades anthology. This work helped to define the cyberpunk genre.
  • The Diamond Age
    The Diamond Age: Or, A Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer is a postcyberpunk novel by Neal Stephenson. It is to some extent a science fiction bildungsroman or coming-of-age story, focused on a young girl named Nell, and set in a future world in which nanotechnology affects all aspects of life. The novel deals with themes of education, social class, ethnicity, and the nature of artificial intelligence. The Diamond Age was first published in 1995 by Bantam Books, as a Bantam Spectra hardcover edition. In 1996, it won both the Hugo and Locus Awards,[1] and was shortlisted for the Nebula and other awards. In 2009, a six-hour miniseries adapted from the novel was slated for development for the Syfy Channel, although the adaptation did not ultimately emerge.
  • Filter bubble
    A filter bubble is a result of a personalized search in which a website algorithm selectively guesses what information a user would like to see based on information about the user (such as location, past click behavior and search history) and, as a result, users become separated from information that disagrees with their viewpoints, effectively isolating them in their own cultural or ideological bubbles. Prime examples are Google Personalized Search results and Facebook’s personalized news stream. The term was coined by internet activist Eli Pariser in his book by the same name; according to Pariser, users get less exposure to conflicting viewpoints and are isolated intellectually in their own informational bubble. Pariser related an example in which one user searched Google for “BP” and got investment news about British Petroleum while another searcher got information about the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and that the two search results pages were “strikingly different”. The bubble effect may have negative implications for civic discourse, according to Pariser, but there are contrasting views suggesting the effect is minimal and addressable.
  • Grindhouse Wetware
    Augmenting humanity using safe, affordable, open source technology.
  • The Matrix
    The Matrix is a 1999 American-Australian neo-noir science fiction action film written and directed by the Wachowskis, starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, and Joe Pantoliano. It depicts a dystopian future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality called “the Matrix”, created by sentient machines to subdue the human population, while their bodies’ heat and electrical activity are used as an energy source. Computer programmer “Neo” learns this truth and is drawn into a rebellion against the machines, which involves other people who have been freed from the “dream world”.
  • Duck Duck Go
    DuckDuckGo is an Internet search engine that emphasizes protecting searchers’ privacy and avoiding the filter bubble of personalized search results. DuckDuckGo distinguishes itself from other search engines by not profiling its users and by deliberately showing all users the same search results for a given search term.[4] DuckDuckGo emphasizes getting information from the best sources rather than the most sources, generating its search results from key crowdsourced sites such as Wikipedia and from partnerships with other search engines like Yandex, Yahoo!, Bing, and Yummly.
  • Cyberpunk 2020
    Cyberpunk, mainly known by its second edition title Cyberpunk 2020, is a cyberpunk role-playing game written by Mike Pondsmith and published by R. Talsorian Games in 1988. Because of the release in 1990 of the second edition, set in a fictional 2020, the first edition is often now referred to as Cyberpunk 2013, following the fictional year, 2013, in which the game was set when it was first released in 1988. The third edition, published by R. Talsorian Games in 2005, is referred to as Cyberpunk V3.0 and is set further along the same fictional timeline as the former editions, during the 2030s.
  • Shadowrun
    Shadowrun is a science fantasy tabletop role-playing game set in a near-future fictional universe in which cybernetics, magic and fantasy creatures co-exist. It combines genres of cyberpunk, urban fantasy and crime, with occasional elements of conspiracy fiction, horror and detective fiction. From its inception in 1989, Shadowrun has remained among the most popular role-playing games. It has spawned a vast franchise that includes a series of novels, a collectible card game, two miniature-based tabletop wargames, and multiple video games.
  • Count Zero
    Count Zero is a science fiction novel written by William Gibson, originally published 1986. It is the second volume of the Sprawl trilogy, which begins with Neuromancer and concludes with Mona Lisa Overdrive, and is a canonical example of the cyberpunk subgenre.
  • Count Zero
    Mona Lisa Overdrive is a cyberpunk novel by William Gibson published in 1988 and the final novel of the Sprawl trilogy, following Neuromancer and Count Zero. It takes place eight years after the events of Count Zero and is set, as were its predecessors, in The Sprawl. The novel was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel, the Hugo Award for Best Novel, and the Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel in 1989.
  • Pattern Recognition
    Pattern Recognition is a novel by science fiction writer William Gibson published in 2003. Set in August and September 2002, the story follows Cayce Pollard, a 32-year-old marketing consultant who has a psychological sensitivity to corporate symbols. The action takes place in London, Tokyo, and Moscow as Cayce judges the effectiveness of a proposed corporate symbol and is hired to seek the creators of film clips anonymously posted to the internet.
  • Punk Rock
    Punk rock (or simply punk) is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands rejected perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk bands typically use short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produced recordings and distributed them through informal channels.
  • Cyberpunk 2077
    Cyberpunk 2077 is a planned action role-playing video game developed by CD Projekt RED, based on the Cyberpunk series of tabletop role-playing games.[2][3] Cyberpunk 2077 will feature a dystopian futuristic world in which ultra-modern technology co-exists with a degenerated human society. First announced in May 2012, as of May 2016, the game is still early in development.
  • Tesla Motors
    Tesla Motors, Inc. is an American automotive and energy storage company that designs, manufactures, and sells electric cars, electric vehicle powertrain components, and battery products. Tesla Motors is a public company that trades on the NASDAQ stock exchange under the symbol TSLA. During the first quarter of 2013, Tesla posted profits for the first time in its history.
  • Tesla Motors
    Elon Reeve Musk( born June 28, 1971) is a South African-born Canadian-American business magnate, engineer, and investor. He is the founder, CEO and CTO of SpaceX; co-founder, CEO and product architect of Tesla Motors; chairman of SolarCity, co-chairman of OpenAI; co-founder of Zip2; and co-founder of PayPal.As of April 2016, he has an estimated net worth of US$12.3 billion, making him the 68th wealthiest person in the US. Musk has stated that the goals of SolarCity, Tesla Motors, and SpaceX revolve around his vision to change the world and humanity.[20] His goals include reducing global warming through sustainable energy production and consumption, and reducing the “risk of human extinction” by “making life multiplanetary”[21][22] by setting up a human colony on Mars. He has envisioned a high-speed transportation system known as the Hyperloop, and has proposed a VTOL supersonic jet aircraft with electric fan propulsion, known as the Musk electric jet.
  • Cyberpunk Forums
    An online discussion forum for the collective cyberpunk community.
  • Cyberpunk Forums
    The Cyberpunk Database: movies, games, music, books.
  • Industrial music
    Industrial music is a genre of experimental/electronic music that draws on transgressive and provocative themes. The term was coined in the mid-1970s with the founding of Industrial Records by Genesis P-Orridge of Throbbing Gristle and Monte Cazazza; on Throbbing Gristle’s debut album The Second Annual Report, they coined the slogan “industrial music for industrial people”. In general, the style is harsh and challenging. AllMusic defines industrial as the “most abrasive and aggressive fusion of rock and electronic music”; “initially a blend of avant-garde electronics experiments (tape music, musique concrète, white noise, synthesizers, sequencers, etc.) and punk provocation”.
  • Rivethead
    A rivethead or rivet head is a person associated with the industrial dance music scene. Unlike the original industrial movement (the members of which are sometimes referred to as “industrialists”), the rivethead scene had coherent youth culture with a discernible fashion style. The scene and its dress code emerged in the late 1980s on the basis of electro-industrial, EBM and industrial rock music. The associated dress style is militaristic with hints of punk aesthetics and fetish wear.
  • Cybergoth
    Cybergoth is a subculture that derives from elements of goth, raver, and rivethead fashion. Unlike traditional goths, Cybergoths follow electronic dance music more often than rock.
  • Wearable computer
    Wearable computers, also known as body-borne computers or wearables are miniature electronic devices that are worn under, with or on top of clothing. This class of wearable technology has been developed for general or special purpose information technologies. It is also used in media development. Wearable computers are especially useful for applications that require more complex computational support, such as accelerometers or gyroscopes, than just hardware coded logic.
  • Parkour
    Parkour is a training discipline using movement that developed from military obstacle course training. Practitioners aim to get from one point to another in a complex environment, without assistive equipment and in the fastest and most efficient way possible. Parkour includes running, climbing, swinging, vaulting, jumping, rolling, quadrupedal movement, and other movements as deemed most suitable for the situation. Parkour’s development from military training gives it some aspects of a non-combative martial art.
  • Futurstate
    Dark and innovative futuristic industrial goth clothing for men & women. Fashion for a dystopian cyberpunk world.
  • Demobaza
    Artisanal clothing from independent designers, globally sourced.
  • Cayce Pollard Units (CPUs)
    CPUs are either black, white, or gray, and ideally seem to have come into this world without human intervention. CPUs fit well in to the cyberpunk sense of style. It is minimal and practical, but is still stylish. You can be dark and brooding, but not goth.
  • Dope Stars Inc.
    Dope Stars Inc. is an alternative and industrial rock band from Rome, Italy formed in 2003. The band was founded by Victor Love, Darin Yevonde, Grace Khold and Brian Wolfram. They have five albums and three EPs released, with the latest being released on February 27, 2015. The band has signed with multiple labels since their inception, with Trisol Music Group being their first. Currently, their albums are distributed by Trisol in Europe, Subsound in Italy, Metropolis Records in North America, and other small labels including Deathwatch Asia in Japan and other countries.
  • Victor Love
    Technomancy is a grimoire of spellware to break the firewall of conformity cast through the digital media.
  • Glass Hammer
    Glass Hammer is an American progressive rock band from Chattanooga, Tennessee. They formed in 1992 when multi-instrumentalists Steve Babb (then known as “Stephen DeArqe”) and Fred Schendel began to write and record Journey of the Dunadan, a concept album based on the story of Aragorn from J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. To their surprise, the album sold several thousand units via the Internet, TV home shopping, and phone orders, and Babb and Schendel were convinced that the band was a project worth continuing.
  • VHS Glitch
    VHS Glitch Music composer for games and visual media and independent Synth artist.
  • Vaporwave
    Vaporwave is a musical micro-genre that emerged in the early 2010s among Internet communities. It is characterized by a nostalgic fascination with retro (typically that of the 1980s, 1990s, and early-mid 2000s) cultural aesthetic, video games, technology and advertising, and often involves the fusion of modern popular music with lounge, smooth jazz and elevator music. Musical sampling is prevalent within the genre, with samples often pitched, layered or altered in classic chopped and screwed style. Central to the style is often a critical or satirical preoccupation with consumer capitalism, popular culture, and new-age tropes.
  • Hardcore Harry
    Henry is resurrected from death with no memory, and he must save his wife from a telekinetic warlord with a plan to bio-engineer soldiers.
  • High-Rise (film)
    High-Rise is a 2015 British thriller directed by Ben Wheatley, starring Tom Hiddleston, Jeremy Irons, Sienna Miller, Luke Evans, and Elisabeth Moss. The screenplay by Amy Jump is based on the 1975 novel of the same name by J.G. Ballard. It was produced by Jeremy Thomas through his production company Recorded Picture Company.
  • High-Rise (novel)
    High-Rise is a 1975 novel by J. G. Ballard. The story depicts a luxury high-rise building as its affluent residents gradually descend into violent chaos. As with Ballard’s previous novels Crash (1973) and Concrete Island (1974), High-Rise explores the ways in which modern social and technological landscapes could alter the human psyche in provocative and hitherto unexplored ways. In 2015, it was adapted into a film of the same name by director Ben Wheatley.
  • J.G. Ballard
    James Graham “J. G.” Ballard (15 November 1930 – 19 April 2009) was an English novelist, short story writer, and essayist. He came to be associated with the New Wave of science fiction early in his career with apocalyptic (or post-apocalyptic) novels such as The Wind from Nowhere (1961) and The Drowned World (1962). In the late 1960s, Ballard produced a variety of experimental short stories (or “condensed novels”), such as those collected in The Atrocity Exhibition (1970), which drew comparisons with the work of postmodernist writers such as William S. Burroughs. In the mid 1970s, he published several novels, among them the highly controversial Crash (1973), a story about symphorophilia and car crash fetishism, and High-Rise (1975), a depiction of a luxury apartment building’s descent into tribal warfare.
  • Snowpiercer
    Snowpiercer is a 2013 English-language South Korean science fiction action film based on the French graphic novel Le Transperceneige by Jacques Lob, Benjamin Legrand and Jean-Marc Rochette. The film is directed by Bong Joon-ho and written by Bong and Kelly Masterson. The film marks Bong’s English-language debut; approximately 80% of the film was shot in English.
  • Deus Ex
    Deus Ex is a cyberpunk-themed action role-playing video game—combining first-person shooter, stealth and role-playing elements—developed by Ion Storm and published by Eidos Interactive in 2000. First published for personal computers running Microsoft Windows, Deus Ex was later ported to Mac OS systems and PlayStation 2. Set in a dystopian world during the year 2052, the central plot follows rookie United Nations Anti-Terrorist Coalition agent JC Denton, as he sets out to combat terrorist forces, which have become increasingly prevalent in a world slipping ever further into chaos. As the plot unfolds, Denton becomes entangled in a deep and ancient conspiracy, encountering organizations such as Majestic 12, the Illuminati and the Hong Kong Triads during his journey.

 

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Brent Morris
Website: http://closetgeekshow.ca
Twitter: https://twitter.com/closetgeekshow

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Epic Descriptions of the Apocalypse

Today on Pop Culture Intelligentsia we’ll talk with Marc Miller about his novel, Agent of the Imperium, that he self-published through Kickstarter. Agent of the Imperium is set in the Traveller universe, which is a science fiction role playing game that has been popular for nearly 40 years. We’ll also chat with Jason Evangelho about the sudden explosion of virtual reality, which held so much promise in the late 90s but only recently has technology caught up with virtual reality’s potential. We’ll also review Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice . In our fourth and last segment we’ll review some exciting new alchemical albums, all of which can be found on Bandcamp.

Show Notes & Links

  • Traveller
    Traveller is a series of related science fiction role-playing games, the first published in 1977 by Game Designers’ Workshop. Various companies published subsequent editions, and the game remains in print.
  • Dungeons & Dragons
    Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&&D or DnD) is a fantasy tabletop role-playing game (RPG) originally designed by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and first published in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules, Inc. (TSR). The game has been published by Wizards of the Coast (now a subsidiary of Hasbro) since 1997. It was derived from miniature wargames with a variation of the Chainmail game serving as the initial rule system. D&D’s publication is commonly recognized as the beginning of modern role-playing games and the role-playing game industry.
  • Star Wars
    Star Wars is an American epic space opera franchise, centered on a film series created by George Lucas. It depicts the adventures of various characters “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away”.
  • Kickstarter
    Kickstarter is the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects. A home for film, music, art, theater, games, comics, design, photography, and more.
  • Agent of the Imperium
    Jonathan Bland is a Decider, empowered by the Emperor himself to deal with the inevitable crises of empire. In the service of the Empire, he has killed more people than anyone in the history of Humanity, to save a hundred times as many. He died centuries ago, but they re-activate his recorded personality whenever a new threat appears. When the crisis is over, they expect he will meekly return to oblivion. He has other ideas.
  • Larry Niven
    Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938) — known as Larry Niven — is an American science fiction writer. His best-known work is Ringworld (1970), which received Hugo, Locus, Ditmar, and Nebula awards. The Science Fiction Writers of America named him the 2015 recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award. His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics. It also often includes elements of detective fiction and adventure stories. His fantasy includes the series The Magic Goes Away, rational fantasy dealing with magic as a non-renewable resource.
  • Aslan
    The Aslan are a Major Race, of four-limbed, upright, bipedal, carnivore/pouncer, humanoid, and felidoid stock.
  • Kziniti
    The Kzinti (singular Kzin) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of cat-like aliens in Larry Niven’s Known Space series.
  • Vargr
    An caninoid, intelligent Major Race, with a humanoid body plan, derived from Ancient genetic manipulation of Terran carnivore/chaser stock, apparently dating from approximately the same time that Humaniti was scattered to the stars.
  • Firefly
    Firefly is an American space western drama television series created by writer and director Joss Whedon, under his Mutant Enemy Productions label. Whedon served as an executive producer, along with Tim Minear. The series is set in the year 2517, after the arrival of humans in a new star system and follows the adventures of the renegade crew of Serenity, a “Firefly-class” spaceship. The ensemble cast portrays the nine characters who live on Serenity. Whedon pitched the show as “nine people looking into the blackness of space and seeing nine different things”.
  • Ian M. Banks
    Iain Banks (16 February 1954 – 9 June 2013) was a Scottish author. He wrote mainstream fiction under the name Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks, including the initial of his adopted middle name Menzies.
  • Google Wave
    Apache Wave is a software framework for real-time collaborative editing online. Google originally developed it as Google Wave. It was announced at the Google I/O conference on May 27, 2009.
  • Vilani
    Human Major Race (Homo sapiens vlandensis) that developed on Vland (Vland 1717) from human stock placed there by the Ancients.
  • Zhodani
    Human Major Race (Homo sapiens zhdotlas) inhabiting the Zhodani Consulate, a region far spinward of the Imperium
  • Psionics
    The use of mental powers to manipulate matter and energy, to sense, and to communicate.
  • Known Space
    The region of space inhabited by humans and thousands of other races, both major and minor.
  • Traveller Map
    The Traveller Map is a interactive map of the universe of the Traveller role playing game, incorporating official data and fan submissions.
  • Traveller Map
    The Traveller Map is a interactive map of the universe of the Traveller role playing game, incorporating official data and fan submissions.
  • Virtual Reality
    Virtual reality or virtual realities (VR), also known as immersive multimedia or computer-simulated reality, is a computer technology that replicates an environment, real or imagined, and simulates a user’s physical presence and environment in a way that allows the user to interact with it. Virtual realities artificially create sensory experience, which can include sight, touch, hearing, and smell.
  • Virtual Reality
    Virtual reality or virtual realities (VR), also known as immersive multimedia or computer-simulated reality, is a computer technology that replicates an environment, real or imagined, and simulates a user’s physical presence and environment in a way that allows the user to interact with it. Virtual realities artificially create sensory experience, which can include sight, touch, hearing, and smell.
  • EVE: Valkyrie
    EVE: Valkyrie is a multiplayer dogfighting shooter game set in the Eve Online universe that is designed to use virtual reality headset technology. Eve: Valkyrie is set to be released on Microsoft Windows and the PlayStation 4 video game console. It is a launch title for Facebook’s Oculus Rift and will launch with Sony’s PlayStation VR. During development, it was called EVE-VR. CCP Games announced on December 9, 2015 that the game would come bundled with every pre-order of the Oculus Rift, which launched on March 28, 2016.
  • Google Cardboard
    Google Cardboard is a virtual reality (VR) platform developed by Google for use with a head mount for a smartphone. Named for its fold-out cardboard viewer, the platform is intended as a low-cost system to encourage interest and development in VR applications. Users can either build their own viewer from simple, low-cost components using specifications published by Google, or purchase a pre-manufactured one. The viewer is used by placing a smartphone into the back of it and viewing through the lenses in the front.
  • Oculus Rift
    The Oculus Rift is a virtual reality headset developed and manufactured by Oculus VR, released on 28 March 2016, making it the first to kickstart consumer-targeted virtual reality headsets.
  • HTC Vive
    HTC Vive is a virtual reality headset developed by HTC and Valve Corporation, released on 5 April 2016. This headset is designed to utilize “room scale” technology to turn a room into 3D space via sensors, with the virtual world allowing the user to navigate naturally, with the ability to walk around and use motion tracked handheld controllers to vividly manipulate objects, interact with precision, communicate and experience immersive environments.
  • PlayStation VR
    PlayStation VR, known by the codename Project Morpheus during development, is a virtual reality gaming head-mounted display developed by Sony Interactive Entertainment and manufactured by Sony, scheduled to launch in October 2016.
  • Samsung Gear VR
    The Samsung Gear VR is a mobile virtual reality headset developed by Samsung Electronics, in collaboration with Oculus, and manufactured by Samsung. The headset was released on 27 November 2015.
  • EVE Online
    Eve Online (stylised EVE Online) is a persistent world massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) developed and published by CCP Games. Players of Eve Online can participate in a number of in-game professions and activities, including mining, piracy, manufacturing, trading, exploration, and combat (both player versus environment and player versus player). The character advancement system is based upon passively training skills in real time, even while not logged into the game.
  • Gunjack: EVE
    Gunjack is an action-packed arcade shooter built from the ground up for virtual reality. Immerse yourself in a visually stunning sci-fi world of danger and destruction, available for the Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR and HTC Vive headsets.
  • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice
    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is a 2016 American superhero film featuring the DC Comics characters Batman and Superman. It is a follow-up to 2013’s Man of Steel and the second installment in the DC Extended Universe. The film is directed by Zack Snyder, distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, with a screenplay by Chris Terrio and David S. Goyer, and features an ensemble cast including Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Jesse Eisenberg, Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne, Jeremy Irons, Holly Hunter and Gal Gadot. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is the first live-action film to feature both Batman and Superman, as well as the first theatrical film to feature live-action portrayals of Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and the Flash. In the film, eccentric criminal mastermind Lex Luthor, obsessed with defeating Superman, manipulates Batman into preemptively battling him, before they unite with Wonder Woman to fight another threat.
  • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice
    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is a 2016 American superhero film featuring the DC Comics characters Batman and Superman. It is a follow-up to 2013’s Man of Steel and the second installment in the DC Extended Universe. The film is directed by Zack Snyder, distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, with a screenplay by Chris Terrio and David S. Goyer, and features an ensemble cast including Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Jesse Eisenberg, Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne, Jeremy Irons, Holly Hunter and Gal Gadot. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is the first live-action film to feature both Batman and Superman, as well as the first theatrical film to feature live-action portrayals of Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and the Flash. In the film, eccentric criminal mastermind Lex Luthor, obsessed with defeating Superman, manipulates Batman into preemptively battling him, before they unite with Wonder Woman to fight another threat.
  • Digital Gnosis “Consolamentum”
  • Shea Bilé “Ashes Out of Balance”
  • SØLVE “the negative (perspective 4)

 

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Joseph Aleo
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/josephaleo

Brent Morris
Website: http://closetgeekshow.ca
Twitter: https://twitter.com/closetgeekshow

Mikel OD
Website: http://digitalracket.tumblr.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Mikel_OD

_TLR_
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/_tlr_

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